We need to talk about money: what the cost-of-living crisis means for working-class classicists

In recent months, news headlines have increasingly focused on the experiences of those affected by the cost-of-living crisis and university students (and, in many cases, staff) are no exception. In July 2022, a survey by the National Union of Students (NUS) found that 11% of students and apprentices have sought support from food banks, with READ MORE

“I Still See the Elitism”. Classical Languages and the Language of Class at Liverpool

by Marco Perale At the University of Liverpool, no prior knowledge of either Greek or Latin is required to study Classics, Classical Studies, or Ancient History. Unlike some other institutions in the UK, we give students the possibility to start from scratch, that is from the alphabet in Greek and from really basic sentences in READ MORE

If Class Were a Protected Characteristic

by Lilah Grace Canevaro, Mirko Canevaro, Henry Stead, Eris Williams-Reed The CUCD Equality and Diversity Report published in 2020 offered a valuable insight into the ‘current state of the discipline’ and has since prompted some productive actions across the UK and beyond. At the outset, the report indicated that its analysis focused on gender and READ MORE

Working-Class Classics: Myths, Stories and Experiences

Lilah Grace Canevaro and Mirko Canevaro, University of Edinburgh ‘Working-Class Classics: A Conversation’ took place on Thursday 22nd April. The event featured 10 speakers and was attended by over 60 people. The presentations were impassioned, the discussion equally so, and the sharing of war stories had a powerful impact. We heard from undergraduates, postgraduates, postdocs and READ MORE

Classics and the Unprotected Characteristic: Towards a Network of Working-Class Classicists

Lilah Grace Canevaro and Mirko Canevaro, University of Edinburgh Class is not listed as a protected characteristic in the Equality Act 2010. Class is not necessarily visible, and it is not always talked about. But class plays a crucial role in both access to university and the university experience. The class divide is particularly evident READ MORE